Bleier traded, A-Rod makes retirement official, A-Rod mgr.? and a rule

Yankee Stadium Frieze

Designated for assignment last week when the Yanks picked up Chris Carter, Richard Bleier was traded today to the Orioles for a player to be named later or ca$h considerations.

A-Rod showed up at spring training to be an instructor (and one expensive one at that). When asked about a comeback, he mentioned that since that last game as a Yankee on August 12th of last year that some teams reached out to him but that no, he isn’t coming back. He’s officially retired.

This week there has been some talk of A-Rod as a manager, maybe even replacing Girardi. I’m not in favor of that for a couple different reasons. First, how would he handle a pitching staff? Houk, Berra, Torre and Girardi, to name some recent Yankees managers, were all catchers. A-Rod wasn’t.

Also, take a GOOD look at some of the greatest managers of all time. How many great players do you see? Rose wasn’t especially a good manager before his suspension from baseball. Neither was Ted Williams in his short term as manager,nor Eddie Mathews or Mel Ott. Ryne Sandberg? Bust. Player-managers like Tris Speaker succeeded because they were still PLAYING.

The great managers are usually those who were NOT great when playing (Joe Torre being an exception) but who got to the majors based on their brains and tenacity not their playing skill. Bobby Cox, Tony LaRussa, Billy Martin, Sparky Anderson, Whitey Herzog and Dick Williams weren’t great players but were great managers. Casey Stengel wasn’t known as an all-time great player, neither Miller Huggins. The same can be said for people who never made the majors like Joe Maddon, Jim Leyland, Earl Weaver or Joe McCarthy.

Being a great player doesn’t make you a great manager. Quite the opposite.

Lastly, MLB is making a change to the intentional walk. I hate it. Now, a manager only need to signal and the batter takes his base. No pitches need to be thrown. It doesn’t happen often, but I’ve seen wild pitches, passed balls, stolen bases off those balls thrown wide of the plate. Heck, last year a pitcher threw a ball not far off the plate, Gary Sanchez swung at it and just missed hitting a HR (it was caught just short of the fence for a sac fly). Terrible decision. I’m going to hate this rule.

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