Category Archives: The Front Office

Yanks lose players in Rule 5 draft.

Yankee Stadium Frieze

Before I get into this year’s rule 5 draft, an explanation from Wikipedia:

Description

As in the amateur draft, the selection order of the teams is based on each team’s win-loss record from the prior regular season, each round starting with the team with the worst record and proceeding in order to the team with the best record. Any player selected under Rule 5 is immediately added to his new team’s 40-man roster; thus, teams who do not have an available roster spot may not participate in the Rule 5 draft.Players who are not currently on their team’s 40-man roster are eligible to be selected in the Rule 5 draft, but only after a standard exemption period has elapsed. See Selection eligibility below.

If chosen in the Rule 5 draft, a player must be kept on the selecting team’s 25-man major league roster for the entire season after the draft—he may not be optioned or designated to the minors. The selecting team may, at any time, waive the Rule 5 draftee. If a Rule 5 draftee clears waivers by not signing with a new MLB team, he must be offered back to the original team, effectively canceling the Rule 5 draft choice.Once a Rule 5 draftee spends an entire season on his new team’s 25-man roster, his status reverts to normal and he may be optioned or designated for assignment.

To prevent the abuse of the Rule 5 draft, the rule also states that the draftee must be active for at least 90 days. This keeps teams from drafting players, then placing them on the disabled list for the majority of the season. For example, if a Rule 5 draftee was only active for 67 days in his first season with his new club, he must be active for an additional 23 days in his second season to satisfy the Rule 5 requirements.

Any player chosen in the Rule 5 draft may be traded to any team while under the Rule 5 restrictions, but the restrictions transfer to the new team. If the new team does not want to keep the player on its 25-man roster for the season, he must be offered back to the team of which he was a member when chosen in the draft.

Selection eligibility

Players are eligible for selection in the Rule 5 draft who are not on their major league organization’s 40-man roster and:

  • were 18 or younger on the June 5 preceding their signing and this is the fifth Rule 5 draft upcoming; or
  • were 19 or older on the June 5 preceding their signing and this is the fourth Rule 5 draft upcoming.

These exemption periods (one year longer than those in effect previously) went into effect as part of a new Collective Bargaining Agreement in October 2006. The change took effect immediately, exempting many players from the 2006 Rule 5 draft even though they had been signed in some cases more than four years before the new agreement came into effect. Prior to the rule change, players were exempt from the first two or three Rule 5 drafts held after their signing (regardless of the year they were drafted), rather than from the first three or four Rule 5 drafts after their signing.

Cost and example

To prevent excessive turnover in the minor league levels, each draftee costs $50,000. If the draftee does not stay on the selecting team’s 25-man (major league) roster all season, the player must be offered back to his original team at half-price ($25,000). Organizations may also draft players from AA or lower to play for their AAA affiliates (for $12,000) and may draft players from A teams or lower to play for their AA affiliates (for $4,000).[3]

The Rule 5 draft has opened opportunities for teams to take other teams’ top prospects who may not be ready for the major leagues. A prominent example is Johan Santana, who was chosen in the 1999 Rule 5 draft by the Florida Marlins when the Houston Astros declined to put him on their 40-man roster, and then traded to the Minnesota Twins in a pre-arranged deal.[4] The Twins kept Santana on their roster for the 2000 season, despite the pitcher’s subpar performance that season (6.49 ERA) which was unsurprising given his youth and inexperience. After the 2000 season, the Twins had the right to option Santana to their minor league system, but chose not to during the 2001 season. He was briefly optioned to Class AAA at the start of the 2002 season, then returned to the major leagues at the end of May and established himself as an above-average pitcher; he went on to win Cy Young Awards in 2004 and 2006. Santana had not played above Class A in minor league baseball before being chosen in the Rule 5 draft,[5] and he likely would not have made his major league debut until at least the 2001 or the 2002 season with the Astros, if at all.[citation needed]

The Yanks lost these players in the Rule 5 draft on Thursday (you can’t protect everyone, and with the Yanks’ strong farm system…..)

RHP Angelo Gomez to the Braves.

LHP Nestor Cortes to the Orioles. Cortes just turned 23 and in A+, AA and AAA went 7-4, 2.06 this year.

1B Mike Ford to Seattle. 25, a lefty hitter. Between AA/AAA hit .270-20-86.

RHP Jose Mesa, the son of the long term reliever Jose Mesa. to the Orioles.

RHP Yancoules Baez to the Twins.

C Sharif Othman, 28, to Miami. Othman was only in High A/AA and hit .223-7-22 in 72 games. A bit old to be in the low minors.

Pardon my spelling on some players.

The Yanks did take OF Junior Soto from Cleveland. A righty hitter, he was in A ball and hit .172-9-17 in 52 games. Just 20.  This was in the minor league portion of the draft and not the portion described above.

 

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Yankees thoughts after getting Stanton.

Yankee Stadium Frieze

From the NY Post. Interesting words from new Yankees manager Aaron Boone. Could this be his managerial style (barring the fights, controversy and drinking that went with Billy?)

Q: If you could pick the brain of one manager in the history of baseball, who would it be?
A: I think I’d want to go back and just sit down with Billy Martin … see what’s going on there. I’ve heard, obviously a number of (chuckle) incredible stories over the years, but he’d be a guy that I think it’d be cool to sit down with and just hear him talk about the game.

Q: What do you think you might ask him?
A: (Chuckle) I don’t know if I’d ask him much. I’d rather just be a fly on the wall and sit there and say, “Just start telling these stories.” I don’t know, “Just tell me about back in the day,” not only as a player but then obviously all of his managing stints and just the colorful character that he was. I would just want to sit there and listen to some of the stories he I’m sure has for days.

Also, an interesting article in the Post about how Jeter may NOT want to help the Yankees, despite what you may see on Twitter or YouTube about any possible “collusion” because of the Stanton deal.

Jeter does hold grudges, and still may hold one because of his last contract negotiation. He really (as the article points out) hasn’t shown up at the Stadium that much since his retirement, and now, as a part-owner of the Marlins, could be expected to show up even less—and this may have occurred even without his new ownership or new fatherhood.

Also, don’t you think Jeter would be aware of the backlash that would (and is) occurring anytime he makes a deal with the Yankees?

Also, …

All the talk will be about Judge and Stanton, and deservedly so, since you have the two HR leaders from last year on the same team, with 52 and 59 HR respectively. They are the ones who finished as the AL runner up for MVP and the NL MVP.

But let’s not forget…

Gary Sanchez also was in that HR derby at last year’s All-Star game, and actually was the one who knocked out Stanton. Sanchez, despite missing a few weeks last year, hit 33 HR. And how can you forget what he did at the end of the 2016 season?

Didi Gregorius set a Yankees’ SS record with 25 HR last year, and how could you forget the two HR he hit in Game 5 of the ALDS off of Corey Kluber, the CYA winner?

Lastly, Greg Bird. Yes, Bird had a poor year because of the ankle injury that cost him most of the season and that required surgery. But remember the great spring training he had?

Not only that, but when he came back and was healthy, he hit .253-8-25 in his last 29 games.

Let’s do some math. 29 x 5 = 145. Basically a full season of 162 with some days off for rest.

Now multiply x 5. .253-40-125. Forget the batting average. 40 and 125.

Add this to Judge, Stanton, Sanchez and Didi. And don’t forget that Gardner even hit 20+ HR last season.

I think a lot of people are going to overlook Bird, and barring injury, I think he will shock some people next year.

Some people have come out with their lineups. Here is mine as for now, and my reasoning:

Gardner
Judge
Bird
Stanton
Sanchez
Gregorius
Hicks
Headley
Torreyes/Wade/Torres

Ok, some people may wonder why keep Judge at 2. Here’s why: 127 walks, which led the AL. An OBP of .422. You want guys with high OBPs in front of Stanton. Some people have Didi Gregorius #2 in the lineup. Not me. Didi only walked 25 times last year. OBP .318, over 100 points lower than Judge. Give Stanton more opportunities to drive in runs. That is why I have Didi in the 6 slot. Get a high OBP guy in front of Stanton.

Bird #3. You want to break up the righty bats. And with Stanton hitting behind him, Bird, whose lefty swing is tailor made for Yankee Stadium, gets protection like Maris got when Mantle was hitting behind him. Or Ruth got with Gehrig. Judge on base, you don’t want to face Stanton, Bird gets more pitches to hit.

Sanchez 5. Protects Stanton.

Torres could be in the minors until June. So Torreyes is probably a stop gap 2B until Torres is ready. Keeping Torres down for 2 1/2 weeks delays his free agency a year and keeping him there until early June delays his arbitration another year. Besides, he hasn’t played too much at 2B so he can get experience there and when he’s ready in early June you can bring him up.

Torreyes, despite hitting .292, doesn’t have much power, and only walked 11x in 2017. Hence the 9 spot.

A tough lineup to crack. Ellsbury, who is behind Stanton, Judge, Hicks and Gardner, becomes the most expensive defensive replacement (and with those guys, it won’t be necessary; all are decent outfielders)/pinch runner ever. Now if the Yanks can move Ellsbury and his no-trade clause, then that can open a spot for…

Clint Frazier or Billy McKinney. Otherwise both are blocked and could be trade bait for ….

pitching help.

Also blocked, for now, are Thairo Estrada (by Torres, Didi and Headley) and Miguel Andujar (by Headley and possibly Torres).

Not trading any of those top prospects in the Stanton deal (Guzman and Devers, both of whom haven’t even played at Low A Charleston, went in the deal) leaves you open to trading one of those top prospects for a top of the line starter.

You also have pitchers who are top prospects who are, as of now, blocked. Chance Adams, Justus Sheffield, Albert Abreu, Domingo Acevedo and Domingo German to name five.

So the Yanks, should they need to make a deal, still have top prospects to trade. Also, they could try to find a taker for Ellsbury or Headley, but may have to eat $$$$ in order to do so.

Only by dumping Headley do I feel that they can retain Todd Frazier. The Yanks still want under the cap, and that became more difficult with getting Stanton.

The Modern Era HOF voting will be announced tonight. We’ll see if anyone gets in.

From mlb.com: The 10 Modern Baseball Era finalists include nine former players and one former executive: Steve Garvey, Tommy John, Don Mattingly, Marvin Miller, Jack Morris, Dale Murphy, Dave Parker, Ted Simmons, Luis Tiant and Alan Trammell. (One -time Yankees in bold).

 

 

 

Yanks finalizing Cashman extension; Ohtani chooses Angels.

Yankee Stadium Frieze

The Yanks are finalizing Brian Cashman’s extension as Yankees’ GM. 5 years, $25MM. Cashman has been GM since 1998.

The Angels won the Shohei Ohtani sweepstakes. One downside to it for the Angels. It means that Albert Pujols, who is really slowing up, will have to play 1B more in order to let Ohtani DH.

Giancarlo Stanton has refused to waive his no-trade clause to the Giants and Cardinals and they have stopped trying to trade for him. Stanton apparently is interested in waiving it for one of last year’s four finalists: the Astros, Dodgers, Yankees or Cubs.

As interesting as it would be to see Stanton in the same lineup with Judge, Bird, Sanchez, Didi, etc., a few questions:

You are just getting out of A-Rod’s deal and would the Yankees really want to jump into something similar? Hal wants to get under that cap so he can actively pursue a great free agent class after the 2018 season. Getting Stanton negates that.

What kind of prospects would you have to give up? Torres? Andujar? Adams? Sheffield? What kind of combination of prospects do you give up and how much would that gut your farm system?

Where does Stanton go, DH?

 

Boone’s hiring. Pros and cons.

Yankee Stadium Frieze

So the Yanks have hired Aaron Boone as their new manager, so things will be quite interesting in spring training of 2018, without Shohei Ohtani. (See next post. Ohtani turns down Yankees).

What are the pros and cons of hiring Boone?

Pro: His age. At 44, he may be able to relate better to the younger player.

His broadcasting experience. Excellent communication skills with the players but also with the media, important in NY.

His playing experience, especially his brief time in NY. Been there, done that as a Yankee player. While only there briefly, he can relate to the pressure of putting on the pinstripes that others could not.

With the broadcasting, he was talking to and analyzing all 30 teams. This may be helpful. One of those “know your enemy” kind of deals. Boone, in his role with ESPN over the last several years was talking to all sorts of players, managers, GMs, front office execs all throughout baseball, not just one organization. Know thy enemy, know his weaknesses, attack those weaknesses.

Baseball pedigree. Been around the game his whole life. Grandpa, dad, brother and him all major leaguers, dad a former manager himself.

Cons: Never managed or coached anywhere before. How to manage and relate to players as a boss rather than a media/ex-player. How to relate to a player when you are benching him, sending him down. How to manage a pitching staff or a bullpen. Making in game decisions. Will the game be too fast for him? How quickly can he adjust? Knowing when to challenge a call. Knowing the rule book to challenge an umpire.

What kind of manager will Boone be? An Earl Weaver sit back and wait for the 3-run HR type of guy, or will he be aggressive, hit and run more, run more with stolen bases, use the bunt and the squeeze more (a Billy Martin type)?

What kind of growing pains will there be?

How quickly and in what style will he integrate youngsters like Gleyber Torres and others to the bigs? How will he team with Cashman or Hal?

It’ll be an interesting 2018.

 

Things not as easy for Jeter now that he’s in the front office.

Yankee Stadium Frieze

In his short time as a Marlins’ executive, Derek Jeter has made, and may yet make, some unpopular, controversial decisions, and the public relations, which always were so good when he was Yankees’ SS and captain, have been pretty bad.

First off, he let some popular Marlins figures go, including “Mr. Marlin”, Jeff Conine. Some people were offered positions back, but at significant pay cuts.

Jeter knew coming into this job that he inherited a mess. Lots of cost-cutting and decisions would have to be made that will make Jeter look like the bad guy. This was the first of those types of moves.

Some moves may be necessary, but Jeter will and has come across as heartless, cold and calculating.

Secondly, the problem with Giancarlo Stanton and his huge contract. 10 more years, $295MM. Stanton most likely will be traded this offseason, and it most likely won’t resonate well with Marlins’ fans who will hate to see the 2017 NL MVP go. Stanton won’t be alone, either. Other Marlins players will go as the Marlins seek to gut the team to get to a very low payroll.

Now, another move that is just bad P.R. and may be the icing on the cake so far. A Marlins scout was just let go. The problem is, this scout just had surgery for colon cancer, and needs a kidney transplant. The scout was informed of his layoff while he was, yup, in the hospital, and Jeter did not inform the scout personally but some underling did the dirty deed instead.

Jeter is finding out being a front office exec of the Marlins is a little different than being the beloved captain of the Yankees.

Aaron Boone to be next Yankees manager

Yankee Stadium Frieze

It hasn’t been confirmed by the Yankees, but it is being reported that Aaron Boone will be the next Yankees’ manager.

Boone hasn’t coached or managed anywhere, but has worked as an ESPN broadcaster since retiring in 2009. He is famous for his HR that won the 2003 ALCS for the Yankees over Boston.

Boone’s grandfather, father, and brother were all major leaguers themselves. His father managed as well. Boone has been around the game since, well, since he was born.

Boone, 44, a third baseman, played for the Reds 1997-2003, Yankees 2003, and after having missed 2004 due to injury, was with the Indians 2005-2006, Marlins 2007, Washington 2008 and Houston 2009.

His 162 g. average was .263-18-78 with 15 SB, OPS+ 94.

2003 was his only postseason. In 17 postseason games, he hit .170-2-4. 2003 was also his only All-Star Game selection.

The Yanks were looking for someone who would communicate better with players and was into analytics. Boone, with his broadcasting experience, has the communication and analytics chops, but this is a gamble, since he has no coaching or managing experience. It’ll be interesting to see who his bench coach will be. Maybe Tony Pena?

Boone has said no nepotism, so he wouldn’t be hiring his dad, Bob Boone, a former manager, to be his bench coach. Rest assured, Dad will probably give some advice.

Last year’s bench coach, Rob Thomson, is rumored to now be headed to the Phillies to be their bench coach for new Phillies’ manager Gabe Kapler since Thomson didn’t get the manager job with the Yankees.

Apparently Boone must have really impressed people, because Hal Steinbrenner said that lack of experience would be a concern of his. Boone must have overcome those concerns.

Now for the rest of the coaching staff. Larry Rothschild is coming back as pitching coach, but the rest of the staff is up for grabs.

Also, it’s official. Shohei Ohtani has been posted and the scramble to get him begins.

 

Yanks to interview Beltran for mgr. job. Award for Cashman.

Yankee Stadium Frieze

The sixth managerial interview for the vacant Yankees’ manager job will go to Carlos Beltran.

Beltran, who just retired after winning the WS with the Astros, played for the Yanks from 2014 until he was traded away at the 2016 trade deadline.

Meanwhile, Brian Cashman was named Executive of the Year for 2017 by Baseball America.