Tag Archives: Hernandez

Yankees prospects in the AFL, Hank Aaron awards, and WS Game 2.

Yankee Stadium Frieze

To the Arizona Fall League and Yankees’ prospects. Scottsdale, 6-7, lost 8-2.

SS Thairo Estrada, 4 for 5, .395
LF Billy McKinney 2 for 4, RBI, walk. .321

I don’t know if this will be an omen of things to come via the MVP voting, but the Hank Aaron awards went to Giancarlo Stanton in the NL and Jose Altuve in the AL.

In WS Game 2, the game went extra innings, with both bullpens failing. Houston pulled out a 7-6 win in 11 innings to even up the Series.

It is the first WS win in Houston’s history.

The Dodgers took a 3-1 lead into the eighth. Houston had gotten an RBI single in the third, but the Dodgers got a solo HR by Joc Pederson in the fifth, and a two-run HR by Cory Seager in the sixth.

So going into the eighth, it appeared that LA had solved Keuchel & Verlander back-to-back. Verlander only gave up two hits, but both were homers.

Then the Dodger bullpen failed. Brandon Morrow gave up a leadoff double to Alex Bregman leading off the eighth. Even though closer Kenley Jansen came in, he gave up a single to Carlos Correa which cut it to 3-2.

In the ninth, Jansen gave up a HR to Marwin Gonzalez that tied the game.

In the tenth, both teams traded blows. Josh Fields replaced Jansen and gave up back-to-back homers to Jose Altuve and to Correa. 5-3 Houston. Altuve and Correa combined as the first players to ever go back-to-back in extra innings in Fall Classic history.

But the Dodgers tied it in the bottom of the tenth. Yasier Puig homered to cut it to 5-4. After two strikeouts, Logan Forsythe, a defensive replacement in the top of the inning, walked. A WP and a single by Enrique Hernandez tied the game.

Brandon McCarthy became the new Dodgers’ pitcher and promptly gave up a single to Cameron Maybin, a SB, then a 2-run HR to George Springer which was the deciding blow.

With two out in the bottom of the eleventh, Charlie Culberson homered for the Dodgers to cut it to 7-6, but Puig then struck out to end the game.

A lot of back and forth in the last few innings, but Houston came out on top as both bullpens were bad in those last four innings.

Even though Houston won, relievers Ken Giles and winner Chris Devenski struggled.

If you check the boxscore, you’ll see too often guys who were effective for an inning pulled. Why? Effective, leave him in. Instead you get these guys who came in and stunk. Houston used five pitchers in the game, the Dodgers nine. As a result, you got that slugging match in the end.

Eight HRs were hit. According to mlb.com:

Five of those big flies came in extra innings, setting a record for any MLB game, regular season or postseason — not just the World Series.

 

 

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Dodgers win NL pennant, first time since 1988.

Yankee Stadium Frieze

If the Yankees win Game 6 or 7 in Houston and make it to the WS, they now know who they will face.

The Dodgers.

Thanks to a 3-HR, 7 RBI night by Enrique Hernandez, including a grand slam, the Dodgers won the NL Pennant for the first time since 1988. Since they had the best record in baseball this season, winning 104 games, they will have home field advantage in the World Series.

The Dodgers won 11-1 in Game 5 to close out the NLCS four games to one.

The co-mvps of the NLCS were Chris Taylor and Justin Taylor of the Dodgers. Hernandez’ great night couldn’t give him that.

The Tigers named a new manager, former Twins manager Ron Gardenhire.

In the Arizona Fall League, Scottsdale won 13-7. As for Yankees’ prospects, a GREAT NIGHT.

3B Kyle Holder: 4 for 6, triple, HR, scored 2, drove in 3 runs.
1B Billy McKinney 1 for 4, rbi.
SS Thairo Estrada 2 for 5,
RF Estevan Florial 3 for 5, HR shy of the cycle. 2 RBI.
 

 

The Minors.

Yankee Stadium Frieze

AAA: SWB won 3-2 in 14 innings. Michael Pineda on rehab 4 2/3 iP, 1 R, 3 h, 0 walks and 3 K. It looks like he’ll be back next week. Austin Romine came into the game late at 1B, went 2 for 3 with the GW RBI.

AA: Trenton won 6-0. Caleb Smith 6 Ip, 0 R, 4 H, 1 walk and 11 K. 1B Rob Segedin 2 h, 3 rbi.

High A: 8-4 Tampa loss. C Kyle Higashioka 3 h, rbi. SS Jorge Mateo 2 rbi. RF Jake Skole 2 hits.

A: Charleston won 9-3. C Jake Hernandez 3 hits, 5 rbi.

Game 64. T-time. Tanaka, Teixeira lead Yanks to 4-2 win.

Masahiro Tanaka had a shutout for 8 1/3, and wound up with a 4-2 complete-game victory. He improved his record to 10-1, and his ERA remained at 2.02.

Tanaka’s bid for a shutout was ruined when Robbie Cano hit a 2-run HR with one out in the 9th.

Tanaka went 9, 2 R, 6 H, 1 walk and 11 K.

Tanaka leads the majors in wins (10) and winning pct. (.909). He leads the AL in ERA (2.02), CG (2), and WHIP (.940).

He became the first Yanks’ rookie to win 10 in a season since El Duque in 1998.

The Yanks offense didn’t help much, but just enough. For the twelfth consecutive game, the Yanks’ offense scored fewer than five runs.

The Yanks got a run in the third on an Ellsbury single, and then the big blow, a 3-run HR by Teixeira in the fifth.

Teixeira’s HR was his 11th of the season and #352 of his career.

The win improved the Yanks’ record to 33-31. They are tied with the Orioles for 2nd in the AL East, 4 1/2 behind Toronto. They are 1/2 game out of the last WC spot.

Derek Jeter got two hits and is now at 3374 for his career.

Before the game, the Yanks DFA’d Wade LeBlanc and brought back David Huff from SF for cash considerations. They activated Shawn Kelley off the DL and sent down Matt Daley.

I must admit, I don’t understand the Huff move. He was there last year, and was 3-1, 4.67 in eleven games (ERA+ 87). He wasn’t doing that well with SF either, 1-0, 6.30 in sixteen games of relief. For his career, 22-27, 5.38, ERA+ 75.

For what it’s worth, Boone Logan is struggling with Colorado. 1-1, 5.87, ERA+ 74.

Verlander first pitcher to win an MVP in 19 years. Nathan goes to Texas.

Justin Verlander won the MVP award today, adding to his CYA this year.

The last pitcher to win an MVP was reliever Dennis Eckersley in 1992. The last starter? Roger Clemens in 1986.

In the NL, the last pitcher to win an MVP was Bob Gibson in 1968.

One ironic thing is this: since 2B Charlie Gehringer won the MVP in 1937 (an award I think Joe D. should have won that year), every Tiger that has won the award since has been a pitcher.

1944-1945 (WWII years) Hal Newhouser 29 and 26 wins.
1968 Denny McLain, 31 wins.
1984 Willie Hernandez
2011 Justin Verlander 24 wins.

As far as Yankees are concerned, it’s interesting that big $$$$ personnel like Jeter, CC and Alex got nothing.

Instead:

Granderson finished fourth. Cano sixth (how could four writers leave Cano out of the top 10 on their ballot?)

Mark Teixeira finished 19th despite the .248 B.A. (39 HR, 111 RBI).

No Mo.

But David Robertson got a 10th place vote, putting him 22nd in the voting.

In other news: Joe Nathan signed with Texas as a free agent. I don’t know where Texas would put him (Feliz) but it makes their BP that much stronger.

Update: Judging from Twitter, (SI’s Heyman, ESPN’s Olney) Feliz is to be moved into the rotation. Well, that’s one way to counter the loss of Wilson (also to counter the collapse of Feliz in WS Game 6).

What should be the rationale for retiring numbers?

In today’s NY Post, Mike Vaccaro argues for the retirement of Gary Carter’s #8 by the Mets (along with Keith Hernandez’ #17). As we know, the Yankees were the first team to retire a uniform number when they took Lou Gehrig’s #4 out of circulation.

But what should be the standards for which a uniform number should be retired? After all, there are several uniform numbers that are retired that you say “Huh?”

For example, Billy Martin’s #1. A .257 hitter. As a manager, he led the Yankees to a WS title. But then, Ralph Houk led them to two. Martin’s five terms as Yankee manager had only three years (1976, 1977 and 1983) that were full seasons. Then we have Reggie, who was a Yankee only five seasons, and one of those seasons was shortened by a third due to the 1981 strike.

So is it excellence (for Martin was an average ballplayer)? Longevity (Reggie wasn’t there that long)? Tragedy (Gehrig/Munson)? What is the standard?

The Mets may go the knee-jerk route and retire Carter’s #8. If they do, great. If they don’t, well… My prayers go out to Carter, but Carter’s #8 is retired where it should be retired—by the Montreal/Washington franchise. Carter played for the Expos (now Nationals) from 1974-1984 and in 1992. For the Mets, Carter had these seasons:

1985 .281-32-100, OPS+ 138, AS, SS, 6th in MVP
1986 .255-24-105, 115, AS, SS, 3rd in MVP
1987 .235-20-83  83  AS
1988 .242-11-46  93  AS
1989 .183-2-15  51

Really. Yes, he was an inspirational leader of the 1986 WS champs. But he only played five seasons with the Mets, and only two were good. 1987 wasn’t. By 1988 he was shot. Two playoffs, 1 WS. In his Mets years, Carter averaged 120 g/season, .249-18-70. OPS+ 104. Not to be cruel, but is that really worthy of the number being retired? By contrast, with Montreal from 1975-1984, the numbers were ..271-21-79, OPS+ 122. 140 g/season. 1977-1984 .275-24-85, OPS+ 128. Now we are talking.

Hernandez came to the Mets in the middle of 1983.
1983 .306-9-37 as a Met, OPS+ 140; Overall .297-12-63, OPS+ 131; GG 21st in MVP
1984 .311-15-94, 143; 2nd in MVP, GG, AS, SS
1985 .309-10-91, 129  GG, 8th in MVP
1986 .310-13-83, 140, AS, GG 4th in MVP
1987 .290-18-89, 120  AS, GG
1988 ..276-11-55, 120 GG missed some 60 games
1989 .233-4-19, 91  missed half the season.

So Hernandez had four good full seasons, two decent half-seasons. He was there six and a half seasons.

Is that enough? The Astros have a number retired for Jim Umbricht, who was 9-5, 3.06 in his MLB career.

From Wikipedia:

Umbricht underwent surgery to remove a tumor from his leg in March 1963 but was able to return to the Colt .45s to post a 4-3 won/loss record and a solid 2.61 earned run average in 35 games that season. Umbricht succumbed to malignant melanoma on the eve of the 1964 campaign in Houston at the age of 33. His uniform number (32) was immediately retired by the club (known since 1965 as the Houston Astros) and the Astros’ MVP award was named in his honor.

This isn’t to diminish the courage of Umbricht. Nor to diminish the impact of someone like Thurman Munson, who died too young in a plane crash.

It is to wonder where you may draw the line. What is the criterion? Especially when you have a lot of numbers retired, as the Yankees do. #1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8 (for two players), 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49…  you can assume that 2 (Jeter), 42 (Rivera) and 6 (Torre) are to come. Williams 51 is a distinct possibility as is Pettitte’s 46. Deserved? Some yes, others you wonder about.

But short of seeing players look like football players (and we are seeing some of that now, with Joba’s 62, Hughes 65, Aceves had 91) where does it stop?

Look at the Celtics, and they may need to make room for Pierce, Allen, Garnett,… maybe even Rondo if he continues to perform well. They already have how many numbers retired.

What should the criterion be?

To me, it’s just funny when someone has their number retired when they are most famous for playing elsewhere. Carter, like Henry Aaron (Brewers #44), fits that category.

AL CYA to King Felix, Price 2nd and CC 3rd.

Felix Hernandez of the Mariners wins the AL CYA, despite a 13-12 record. Hernandez’ record was due to terrible run support from a lousy team. Put him on the Yanks and maybe he goes 21-4 or something.

Despite the 13-12, Hernandez, 24, led the majors in ERA (2.27) and led the AL in starts and IP. He struck out 232 in 249 2/3 IP. He also led the AL in Fewest H/9 IP and the majors in batters faced.

David Price of the Rays came in 2nd.  Price, 25, was 19-6, 2.72.

The Yankees’ CC Sabathia finished 3rd. CC, 30, was 21-7, 3.18. CC co-led the majors in wins. He started 34 games, tying King Felix for the lead in that category.