Tag Archives: Rivera

Next year’s HOF ballot. Mo! Pettitte? Mussina? Other Yankees’ news.

Yankee Stadium Frieze

So this year’s HOF class has been chosen.

Personally, I hope to see if a bus is going up to the 2019 induction. I’d love to be there for Mo.

The main candidates for the summer of 2019 are:

Off this year’s ballot? Edgar Martinez, who will be on his last year, and Ex-Oriole AND Yankee Mike Mussina, who has a couple of years left and who is trending upward.

It looks like Bonds, Clemens and Schilling are stalling out in the 50’s, whereas 75% is needed for induction.

Of course, 2019 is Mo. He comes on the ballot for the first time and the only question is how many huckleberrys don’t vote for him.

He is a slam dunk. I would love to be there. Book your busses now. Maybe Mo and Moose?

Pettitte is also on the 2019 ballot, and it’s his first year. He has serious credentials, 256 wins, 19 more in the postseason, but the HGH admission will hurt him.

Other new candidates on the 2019 ballot that will merit serious consideration are Lance Berkman, Roy Oswalt, Roy Halladay and Todd Helton.

The Yanks also announced that P.J Pilittere (sp.?) will join Marcus Thames as a hitting coach. So manager Aaron Boone, it seems, has Pilittere and Thames (hitting coaches), Josh Bard (bench coach), Reggie Willets 1B coach, Mike Harkey BP and Larry Rothschild pitching, Phil Nevin 3B coach, and Carlos Mendoza infield coach.

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Hall to induct 4 more, Mussina gains but falls short.

Yankee Stadium Frieze

The BBWAA elected four more members to the Hall of Fame, but Mike Mussina fell little short. 75% is required for induction.

Joining Alan Trammell and Jack Morris, who were elected via a Veterans’ Committee earlier, are

Chipper Jones 97.2%: Atlanta 3B/LF 1993-2012. .303. Over 2700 hits. 468 HR. OPS+ 141 (100 is average). 1995 WS Champ. 8X All Star. 1999 MVP. 6x Top 10 MVP.

Jim Thome 89.8%. 612 HR. 1991-2012. Indians, Phillies, White Sox, Dodgers, Twins, Indians again, Phillies again, Orioles. OPS+ 147. 4x top 10 MVP. 5x All-Star. 3B/1B.

Both Jones and Thome were elected in their first year on the ballot.

Vladimir Guerrero 92.9%. 1996-2011. Expos, Angels, Rangers, Orioles. OPS+ 140. 449 HR. .318.  Almost 2600 career hits. MVP 2004. 9x All-Star. 6x top 10 in MVP.

Trevor Hoffman 79.9%. Marlins, Padres, & Brewers. 601 career saves, 2nd only to Mariano Rivera. 7X all-Star. 2x Top 10 MVP for a reliever. 4x CYA consideration, finishing as the runnerup 2x.

Those over 50% were:

Edgar Martinez: 70.4%, 20 votes short. Next year will be his last year on the ballot. That may push him over the top.

Mike Mussina 63.5%. Gaining. Should get in soon, if not 2019 with Rivera, maybe 2020 with Jeter.

Roger Clemens 57.3%

Barry Bonds 56.4% Both Clemens and Bonds hurt by the steroid allegations.

Curt Schilling 51.2% Hurt by his political stances.

Not getting 5% and falling off the ballot are Johnny Damon & Hideki Matsui.

Some coming on the ballot next year include (I won’t list their stats now, with one exception)

Mariano Rivera (a sure lock, I’d like to know NOW the idiots who WON’T vote for him),

Andy Pettitte (borderline, the HGH revelations will hurt him),

Todd Helton (as with Larry Walker, people will look at him as though his stats were inflated by Colorado, but a .316 hitter, OPS+ 133. Over 2500 hits, 3x top 10 MVP, 369 HR. 5x All Star, 3 GG, but faded too early. 1998-2005 average .338-33-113; but after age 31 .289-12-61. Personally, I feel he needed 4 more years of that 1998-2005 excellence, and why did he suddenly lose his power at age 31?)

Roy Halladay. Sympathy vote? Unfortunate plane crash, but why was traces of Ambien, morphine and amphetamines in his system? Retired at 36, back pain, can see the painkillers, but for goodness sakes, don’t fly a plane when you are on the meds.

 

Mgr. of year, Doerr, AFL, & another managerial candidate.

Yankee Stadium Frieze

Paul Molitor of the Twins and Torey Luvullo of the Diamondbacks were named the AL and NL Managers of the Year, respectively.

Joe Girardi finished fourth.

HOF 2B Bobby Doerr died Monday at the age of 99. He was the oldest living HOF and oldest MLB player. Now the oldest living HOF is Red Schoendiest.

Doerr played his entire career with the Red Sox, 1937-1951, missing 1945 due to WWII service. His #1 was retired by Boston. He had to retire at the age of 33 due to a bad back.

A 9x All Star, Doerr drove in 100 runs 6x. He led the league in triples with 11 in 1950. 8x he received MVP consideration, and he finished in the top 10 twice.

His 162 g. average was .288-19-108, OPS+115. JAWS, on baseballreference.com lists him as the 22nd best 2B of all-time.

He hit .409 in his only postseason, the 1946 WS when the Red Sox lost to Schoendiest’s Cardinals in seven games.

Add Chris Woodward, Dodgers’ 3B coach, to the list of people to be interviewed by Brian Cashman for the Yankees’ managerial job. Woodward, 41, was a utility infielder for the Blue Jays, Mets, Braves, Mariners, Red Sox, Blue Jays (again) and Mariners (again) from 1999-2011. His 162 g. average was .239-8-47, OPS+ 71. He made the postseason in 2006 with the Mets, going 1 for 1 with a double, and scoring a run.

In the Arizona Fall League, Scottsdale lost 6-5. Yankees’ prospects:

2B Kyle Holder 1 for 5, double, scored a run. .333
SS Thairo Estrada 1 for 4, single, .347
1B Billy McKinney 0 for 4, .281
RF Estevan Florial 3 for 4, 2 doubles, scored a run, RBI. .273

Some Brian Cashman remarks suggest that Gleyber Torres will be given every shot to win the 3B job in spring training over Chase Headley, and it doesn’t appear they will try to sign free agent Todd Frazier. 3B Miguel Andujar is in the mix but the Yanks are worried about his glove (then DH him!). It also looks as if Jacoby Ellsbury will be a $21MM fourth outfielder, with the Yanks going with Gardner, Hicks and Judge in the OF, which would leave Clint Frazier at AAA.

The CYA will be announced today. It’s expected that Luis Severino will finish third.

UPDATE: Jim Rivera, an OF for the 1959 AL Pennant winning Go-Go White Sox, has passed away at the age of 96. Rivera played for the Browns (1952), White Sox (1952-1961) and KC A’s (1961) from 1952-1961. He led the AL in triples with 16 in 1953. He led the majors in SB with 25 in 1955. As a backup OF, he hit .220-4-19, OPS+ 77 in 1959 for the White Sox. He was 0 for 11 in the WS that year. His 162 g. average was .256-11-58, 22 SB, OPS+ 96.

 

 

 

ALDS Game 2. Yanks in 0-2 hole after blowing 8-3 lead. Lose 9-8 in 13.

Yankee Stadium Friezed

Sorry for the late report. I slept in and am not feeling well. Bronchitis again? Same time, just about, every year. Sigh.

1997. Mariano gives up the first of only two postseason HRs he would ever give up. It ties Game 4 for Cleveland and instead of the Yanks winning the series 3 games to 1, the Indians come back to win Game 4 and then Game 5.

2007: The midges. Torre doesn’t pull the team off the field, regrets it later, and his Yankee tenure is over. Joba vs. the bugs.

2017: The Faux HBP that Girardi didn’t challenge. Now Girardi’s contract is up, and I don’t expect him to be fired, but he made a mistake that seems to be as big as Torre’s in 2007.

(ok as for the bad omens…. the Yanks did win it all in 1938, 1958, 1978 and 1998, so we should look forward to 2018, right?)

Anyway, the game started off great when the Yanks knocked around Cleveland ace Corey Kluber. Gary Sanchez hit a 2-run HR in the first inning.

An error by Todd Frazier led to the Indians scoring two unearned runs in the first to tie it up (came back to bite them), then the Indians scored one in the second to go up 3-2. At this point, you are wondering about the Yankees’ starting pitching this postseason. The Indians did lose Edwin Encarnacion due to an ankle injury.

The Yanks went up 6-3 with four in the third. Starlin Castro tied the game and Aaron Hicks hit a 3-run HR.

In the fifth, a two-run HR by Greg Bird made it 8-3. Then the Yanks blew it. For one thing, the game went 13 and they couldn’t score anymore.

CC was pulled in the sixth after 77 pitches. Ok, maybe he should or could have stayed in with an 8-3 lead. But this is how they’ve treated CC for a while now. One out, man on first and in comes Chad Green. Normally a good move and the right one.

But was Green still taxed from the two innings he pitched on Tuesday? Here is where the early knockout of Severino in Tuesday’s wild card game may have come back to bite the Yanks, for Green wasn’t his usual self. He got a flyout for out #2 but couldn’t put Yan Gomes away. After fouling off a few pitches, Gomes doubled.

Then PH Chisenhall was HBP. Or was he?

Chisenall had two strikes on him. Replays showed the ball hit the knob of the bat and ricocheted into Sanchez’ glove. Foul tip, strike three and out of the inning. Instead, the umpire ruled HBP. Bases loaded.

Sanchez pointed to the dugout to challenge. And Girardi did nothing. For the brilliance of Tuesday night, when Girardi pieced together 26 outs out of the bullpen, he bleeped up here.

He stated that the slo-mo replay didn’t come up in the 30 seconds he had to challenge. He also stated that he didn’t want to disturb his pitcher’s rhythm.

What BS. That sounds like the excuses your seven year old kid makes to mommy and daddy when the did gets into trouble.

First off, why aren’t you trusting your catcher when your catcher is urging you to challenge? He’s right there. He caught the ball. To quote Billy Joel, It’s a Matter of Trust. And that matter of trust came up later in the game as well. Players in the dugout were urging the same thing.

Secondly, what do you have to lose by challenging? You win, strike three, out of inning. No, Joe decided to leave it go.

Third, the batter never reacted as if he were hit! He had to be told to go the first.

And you don’t challenge?

As far as his pitcher’s rhythm? Green gave up a grand slam off the foul pole on his second pitch after the incident. 8–7.

We’ll never know what would have happened had he challenged as he should have, got the call and it remains 8-3. There is a huge difference between going home 1-1 in a best-of-five and in going home 0-2. Especially to a team that has won 35 of its last 39 games.

So in came David Robertson, and you had to wonder how much he had left in the tank after his 3 1/3 innings of Tuesday night. Four up, four down, three by strikeouts. Looks good.

But then Girardi tried to extend him. Why? A matter of trust. He trusted Robertson in the eighth over Betances. Betances did pitch in Game 1 (when the Yanks were down 4-0). He also pitched and lost this game. But Betances didn’t come in until other relievers had gone before him.

He tried to extend Robertson, who was already extended on Tuesday night. It didn’t work. Jay Bruce (thanks, Mets) did it again. HR to tie the game.

And so the game went into extras. Kahnle and Chapman came in, then Betances.

Meanwhile in the 11th, Ronald Torreyes pulled a rock. Pinch-running for Todd Frazier, who reached second on an error leading off the inning, Torreyes was picked off second when Brett Gardner had to take a pitch on a sac bunt attempt. Ouch.

Betances came in for the 11th. After Green, Robertson, Kahnle and Chapman. A matter of trust. In because he had to, not so much because Girardi trusted him. After all, if he was trusted, wouldn’t he have come in in the eighth, like usual? It appears that at this point, Girardi doesn’t trust Betances.

Betances had two good innings, but needed to be overextended himself. Working his third inning, he walked the leadoff guy, who stole second. It’s well known that Betances isn’t a good fielder and with his size and delivery, doesn’t hold runners on well. Cleveland took advantage with the SB. Gomes, who extended the AB in the sixth, and who picked off Torreyes in the 11th, got the GW hit.

This is one loss that (unless the Yanks pull off a miracle and win 3 in a row to stun the baseball world and make it to the ALCS) will hurt all winter long.

Sabathia 5 1/3 IP, 4 R, 2 ER, 3 H, 3 W, 5 K.
Green 1/3 IP, 3 R, 2 H, 0 W, 0 K. 1 HBP. Gave up grand slam.
Robertson 1 2/3 IP, 1 R, 1 H, 0 W, 3 K. Gave up HR.
Kahnle 2/3 IP, 0 R, 0 H, 0 W, 0 K.
Chapman 2 IP, 0 R, 2 H, 1 W, 2 K.
Betances (Loss) 2+ IP, 1 R, 1 H, 1 W, 2 K.

Sanchez 2 hits, 2-run HR.
Castro 2 hits, RBI.
Bird 2 hits, 2-run HR.
Hicks 2 hits, 3-run HR.
Todd Frazier 3 hits, but 2 errors.
Torreyes bone-headed PR play.

In the other series, Houston dominated Boston again and the Astros go into Fenway up 2 games to nothing.

In the NL, the Cubs and Dodgers both took Game 1 over the Nationals and Diamondbacks, respectively.

 

Gossage, like Levine, needs to zip it.

Yankee Stadium Frieze

Besides Randy Levine needing to zip it more often, another person who needs to zip it is Rich “Goose” Gossage, who showed up in camp with his annual rant against relief pitchers, and particularly the great and classy Mariano Rivera.

Goose was great. His plaque is in Monument Park, deservedly so. In his prime, 1978-1983 as a Yankee, he averaged 7-5, 2.10, and 25 saves/yr. Remember that he missed 1/2 of 1979 due to the Cliff Johnson fight and 1/3 of 1981 due to the players’ strike. He is in the HOF, rightfully so, with a record of 124-107, 310 saves, 3.01 ERA and ERA+ of 126. (Goose also spent part of 1989 with the Yanks, at the end of his career). In that 1978-1983 time frame, he averaged 1 2/3 innings per appearance.

Goose spent one year starting for the White Sox in 1976.

Now Goose did pitch 2 2/3 innings in that famous Bucky Dent playoff game vs. Boston in 1978.

In what seems to be his annual rant against baseball today, he says (with expletives) not to compare him, Sutter, Fingers, etc. to pitchers like Rivera, Chapman, etc. because the latter day pitchers are one-inning guys. Fair enough.

But the way Goose disparages Rivera is uncalled for. Mariano’s #42 is retired by the Yankees, rightfully so, and Mo should be joining Goose in the HOF in 2019. He should get in almost unanimously, if not unanimously (there is always one jerk out there) on the very first ballot. What’s Goose going to do, boycott the ceremony?

Taking away Mo’s rookie season of 1995, when he started 10 games, from 1996 to the end of his career, Mariano pitched in 950 games, 1216 2/3 IP, averaging almost 1 1/3 innings per appearance—not too far off of Goose’s 1978-1983 average of 1 2/3. Rivera, of course, finished his career 82-60, a record 652 saves, 2.21 ERA and ERA+ a record 205.

And Mo did pitch three innings in Game 7 of the 2003 ALCS.

The game changed. Goose should not hold Mo responsible for that or disparage Mo. Mo did his job, as the job requirements demanded at that time, as good or better than anyone else, just as Goose did his job, as the requirements demanded at the time, as good or better than anyone else.

The game has changed. Pitchers don’t throw complete games anymore. You don’t see starters throwing 300 innings in a season anymore. But you don’t hear Sandy Koufax or Bob Gibson bitching about today’s great starters, do you?

In the same way, relief pitching has changed. I’m old school, and can agree with and sympathize with Gossage’s opinion.

But at the same time, Goose comes across as a bitter, classless, crotchety old man.

It’s to the classy Rivera’s credit that he doesn’t respond in kind. Mo’s not like that.

Enough already. Goose should just praise Mo for the great reliever he was, add that there were two different kinds of eras, and say I was great in mine, Mo was great in his, and be done with it.

Because Goose’s bitching is getting rather tiresome.

Between Goose’s rant and Randy Levine’s gloating over the Dellin Betances’ arbitration case, I was a little ashamed this week—a week I usually can’t wait for, what with spring training starting.

Hey guys, zip it, and let’s concentrate on baseball. Don’t disparage the game and the players but respect and honor good players.

Because your comments this week were very sad to hear, and I’m sure I am not the only Yankees fan saddened, disheartened, and quite frankly, a bit pissed at what I saw and heard.

Game 117. Yanks lose, 12-3.

Yankee Stadium Frieze

When Nathan Eovaldi went down, and the Yanks brought back Luis Severino just a few  days after sending him down after a poor start in Boston, I was shaking my head. Why Severino? Why not Dietrich Enns (13-4, 1.61 between AA and AAA this year)? Enns’ turn in the rotation at AAA probably did not match up with yesterday, but next time the Yanks reach down, I hope Enns gets a shot.

This is nothing against Severino, 22, who I feel is too young to give up on, but Severino’s awful 2016 continued as he was lit up by Tampa Bay yesterday in the Yanks’ 12-3 loss.

The only bright spots for the Yanks were homers by Aaron Judge and Gary Sanchez. For both, it was their second MLB home runs. For Judge, he became the second Yankee (after Joe Lefebvre, 1980) to homer in each of his first two MLB games.

Funnily enough, Severino got 7 of his 11 outs by K.

Severino (L, 1-8, 7.19) 3 2/3 IP, 7 R, 8 H, 1 walk, 7 K. Gave up 2 HR.
Cessa 3 IP, 5 R, 5 H, 1 walk and 2 K. Gave up 1 HR. 5.30
Parker 1 1/3 IP, 0 R, 1 H, 0 walks, 2 K. 2.45 (Sea/NYY)
Shreve 1 IP, 0 R, 1 H, 0 walks, 0 K. 4.00.

The loss dropped the Yanks to 60-57.

Before the game, the Yanks dedicated a plaque to Mariano Rivera, whose #42 was already retired at the end of 2013. On Saturday, they honored the 1996 World Champs on their 20th anniversary, a team Mo was part of.

Game 91. Arrow? No. Teix message? Yes. Yanks beat Seattle, 2-1.

cropped-the-stadium-facade.jpg

I can’t stand Fernando Rodney and that bow and arrow routine he does. I hate hotdogging. You never saw Mariano Rivera show up an opponent.

Which is why today’s 2-1 Yankees win was so sweet. Mark Teixeira sent a “Teix message”, HR #23 of the season (#386 of his career) off of Rodney in the bottom of the eighth to break a 1-1 tie and win the game. With the win, the Yanks go to 50-41 on the season and their AL East lead is increased to 4 games.

It was a pitcher’s duel between CC Sabathia and “King” Felix Hernandez of the Mariners. Seattle scored a run in the top of the fifth courtesy of two ex-Yankees farmhands, as Austin Jackson singled in Jesus Montero.

The Yanks tied it in the bottom of the sixth on a single by Carlos Beltran. Earlier in the day, Beltran was activated off the DL and Rob Refsnyder returned to AAA.

Then in the bottom of the eighth, Teix sent one further than any of Rodney’s imaginary arrows could go. Teix had three of the Yankees’ six hits in the game.

Sabathia 6 IP, 1 R, 6 H, 1 walk and 7 K. 5.25. Maybe the best game he’s pitched this year.

Wilson 1 IP, 0 R, 1 H, 0 walks and 1 K. 2.65.

Betances (W 6-2, 1.47) 1 IP, 0 R, 0 H, 2 walks and 0 K.

Miller (20th save) 1 IP, 0 R, 0 H, 0 walks and 2 K.

Update. A-Rod had a hit, and #3023 tied Lou Brock on the all-time list.