Tag Archives: Soto

Washington stuns Houston to win WS

Yankee Stadium Frieze

In a World Series in which EVERY GAME WAS WON BY THE ROAD TEAM, Washington, the biggest WS underdog since 2007, stunned Houston by winning Game 7 6-2.

It is only the second time Washington, D.C. has the World Series Champ, and it’s the first time since 1924. That team then became the Minnesota Twins in 1961.

This team started its existence as the Montreal Expos in 1969, and this is the first title in franchise history. This, the year after Bryce Harper, the face of the franchise the past few years, left to go to the Phillies in free agency.

Stephen Strasburg was named WS MVP.

Washington stunningly won the WS after starting the season 19-31. They didn’t even win their division. Down in the wild card game, they caught a break in the eighth inning against Milwaukee when Milwaukee’s RF overran the ball in trying to gun down a runner at the plate (the tying run) and as a result, the winning run came around to score.

Then in the NLDS, they took down the 106=win Dodgers. Down in the eighth inning of Game 5, they hit two HR off of Clayton Kershaw to tie the game and got a grand slam by Howie Kendrick in extra innings to win the game and series. They then swept the Cardinals in the NLCS.

In the World Series, they dispatched the 107-win Astros in unconventional fashion, winning all four games in Houston while losing all three games at home. Who’d have thought?

The Astros got off to a 2-0 lead. Yuri Gurriel hit a solo HR in the second off Max Scherzer, and Carlos Correa an RBI single in the fifth. Scherzer, who couldn’t start Game 5 because of a sore neck and who received a shot for the pain, started Game 7 and was not sharp, but kept his team in the game, giving up just two runs in five innings despite being in and out of trouble the whole time.

In the seventh, Washington took the lead with three runs. Anthony Rendon homered to cut the lead to 2-1. Juan Soto walked. Houston manager A.J. Hinch then pulled starter Zack Grienke, a move I wondered about at the time. Grienke had only given up the one run on two hits in 6 1/3 innings.

Reliever Will Harris replaced Greinke and gave up a two-run HR to Kendrick that hit the foul pole. 3-2 Nats, and they never looked back. Harris took the loss.

Patrick Corbin (who I wanted the Yanks to get last offseason when Corbin was a free agent) wound up with the win with three scoreless innings of relief.

Per MLB.com, Kendrick is the first player with multiple go-ahead home runs in the seventh inning or later in winner-take-all games in a single postseason. He also is just the second player to hit a go-ahead homer in the seventh inning or later while their team was trailing in a World Series winner-take-all game. The other was Hal Smith in 1960—the Bill Mazeroski game.

A walk to Adam Eaton, SB and RBI single by Juan Soto made it 4-2 Washington in the eighth.

The Nats tacked two more on in the ninth on a bases-loaded, 2 RBI single by Eaton. Washington got eight of their nine hits in the last three innings as Houston’s bullpen imploded.

 

 

 

WS Game 6. Take it to the limit. Washington forces a Game 7 with a 7-2 win.

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Never, in the history of the four major sports, has a road team won the first six games of a series (of course, football doesn’t have a best of 7).

Until now. Washington beat Houston 7-2 Tuesday night to force a seventh and deciding game tonight (Wednesday). The road team has won every game in the WS so far.

Anthony Rendon had three hits, inc. a 2-run HR, and drove in 5 runs. The HR came after a controversial call that went against the Nats and got manager Dave Martinez ejected—the first manager ejected from a WS game since Bobby Cox of Atlanta in Game 6 of the 1996 WS.

For Justin Verlander, another WS loss. The future HOF pitcher is now 0-6 in the World Series. ROY, CYA, MVP, 3 no-hitters, but no WS victory.

Stephen Strasburg went 8 1/3 IP for the win.

Besides Rendon, Adam Eaton and Juan Soto homered for Washington. Alex Bregman hit one for Houston.

Max Scherzer, who missed his Game 5 start because of a neck injury, apparently feels better after getting a cortisone shot and is expected to start Game 7 for Washington. He’ll be opposed by Houston’s Zack Greinke.

 

 

WS Game 5. Scherzer scratched, Houston goes up 3-2 with 7-1 win.

Yankee Stadium Frieze

Washington ace Max Scherzer was scratched because of neck pain, and Houston took advantage of it for a 7-1 win in Game 5 of the World Series Sunday night.

The win means that the road  team has won each game of the WS so far and that Houston heads back to Texas with a 3 games to 2 lead in the series after having been down 0-2.

Scherzer got shots for the neck pain, and the Nats are hopeful that he can go in Game 7 if there is a Game 7. Sot

Gerrit Cole pitched 7 innings, giving up 1 run (Juan Soto HR), 3 hits, 9 K for the win.

Yordan Alvarez, Carlos Correa and George Springer each had 2-run HRs.

Game 6 is Tuesday night in Houston.

WS game 1. Washington edges Houston, 5-4.

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First in war, first in peace and first to win a Game in the 2019 World Series.

Washington edged Houston 5-4 in Game 1 of the WS. It was the first WS game in franchise history for the former Montreal Expos, and the first win for a Washington team since the 1933 Senators (now the Minnesota Twins) won Game 3 of the 1933 WS.

After winning 20 straight decisions since the end of May, Gerrit Cole finally lost. Of course, Yankees fans wish that this loss would have happened in Game 7 of the ALCS. But Houston won the ALCS in six. What might have been.

Max Scherzer struggled (112 pitches in 5 IP) but got the win.

20 year old Juan Soto (he turns 21 on Friday) had 3 hits and 3 RBI, inc. a HR.

George Springer of Houston homered in his fifth straight WS game, setting a record.


CC Sabathia on Sunday posted a short letter, his goodbye to baseball.

Yanks to find out ALCS opponent tonight. NLCS set as both home teams lose Game 5 in stunning fashions.

Yankee Stadium Frieze

The Yanks will find out their ALCS opponent tonight when the Tampa Bay Rays play the Houston Astros in Houston at 7 PM. If Tampa Bay wins, the Yanks have home field throughout the playoffs as long as they stay in (see below). If Houston wins, Houston does.

The NLCS is set as it’ll be St. Louis and Washington. Both away teams stunned the home opponents in the deciding Game 5 of their respective series.

St. Louis scored TEN runs in the top of the first inning and beat Atlanta 13-1. Ten in the top of the first. Talk about sucking the air out of a stadium right away. How would you like to have a ticket to that game, just settle in your seat, and THAT happens?

The defending two-time NL Champion Dodgers got knocked off, 7-3, in 10 innings by the Washington Nationals. The Dodgers blew a 3-1 eighth-inning lead. Since the Dodgers had a better record than the Yankees, the Yankees will now have WS home-field advantage IF Houston gets knocked out by Tampa Bay or the Yankees.

Clayton Kershaw’s postseason struggles continued. Pitching in relief, he gave up back-to-back homers to Anthony Rendon and Juan Soto that tied up the game in the eighth. Kershaw has a 2.44 career regular season ERA, but it’s two runs higher in the postseason.

Howie Kendrick hit a grand slam in the top of the tenth to win it. Even going back to their days as the Montreal Expos, it’s the first time the franchise has won a postseason series since the Montreal Expos beat the Phillies in the 1981 Eastern Division strike-enforced playoff.

Stunning endings, both of them, and the way Washington beat Milwaukee in the WC game and now here against the Dodgers, you wonder…

 

 

Washington stuns Milwaukee with 3 in 8th, win NL WC game, 4-3.

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The late Bill Buckner may have company. Washington scored 3 runs in the bottom of the eighth to stun Milwaukee and win the NL WC game, 4-3. They’ll face the Dodgers in the NLCS.

The Brewers got 2 runs in the first on a 2-run HR by Yasmani Grandal, and another in the second on a solo HR by Eric Thames.

The Nationals cut it to 3-1 in the third on a solo HR by Trea Turner.

With one out in the bottom of the eighth, Michael Taylor was ruled HBP. It was questionable whether the pitch hit his hand or the bottom of the bat first. It was ruled the hand. An out later, Ryan Zimmerman blooped a broken bat single into center, and then Anthony Rendon walked to load up the bases for the Nationals.

Juan Soto singled. In his haste to get to the ball and make a play at the plate, hopefully to cut down the tying run, Brewers’ RF Trent Grisham overran the ball, which not only allowed the tying run to score, but cleared the bases, putting the Nationals up 4-3–a lead they held on to in the top of the ninth.

A devastating and stunning loss for the Brew Crew.  Washington’s Stephen Strasburg pitched three scoreless innings of relief and wound up with the win.

Minor League Report. Rain, Rain, Go Away for AAA and AA.

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AAA: SWB’s game was suspended with SWB batting in the bottom of the first after Syracuse scored a run in the top of the first. Resumption today.

AA: Trenton’s game was ppd. Makeup today, 4/27.

High A: Tampa (9-13) lost 5-3. An error by SS Oswaldo Cabrera led to three unearned runs for Clearwater. Tampa got just five hits.

Low A: Charleston (10-12) won 8-3. SS Wilkerman Garcia 3 hits. 2 hits each for CF Brandon Lockridge, C Josh Breaux, DH Eric Wagaman, 3B Kyle Gray and LF Canaan Smith. 2 RBI for Breaux and for RF Junior Soto.

Starting P Luis Gil 5 IP, 0 R, 0 H, 3 W, 8 K. (W, 1-1, 1.04)

 

Yanks lose players in Rule 5 draft.

Yankee Stadium Frieze

Before I get into this year’s rule 5 draft, an explanation from Wikipedia:

Description

As in the amateur draft, the selection order of the teams is based on each team’s win-loss record from the prior regular season, each round starting with the team with the worst record and proceeding in order to the team with the best record. Any player selected under Rule 5 is immediately added to his new team’s 40-man roster; thus, teams who do not have an available roster spot may not participate in the Rule 5 draft.Players who are not currently on their team’s 40-man roster are eligible to be selected in the Rule 5 draft, but only after a standard exemption period has elapsed. See Selection eligibility below.

If chosen in the Rule 5 draft, a player must be kept on the selecting team’s 25-man major league roster for the entire season after the draft—he may not be optioned or designated to the minors. The selecting team may, at any time, waive the Rule 5 draftee. If a Rule 5 draftee clears waivers by not signing with a new MLB team, he must be offered back to the original team, effectively canceling the Rule 5 draft choice.Once a Rule 5 draftee spends an entire season on his new team’s 25-man roster, his status reverts to normal and he may be optioned or designated for assignment.

To prevent the abuse of the Rule 5 draft, the rule also states that the draftee must be active for at least 90 days. This keeps teams from drafting players, then placing them on the disabled list for the majority of the season. For example, if a Rule 5 draftee was only active for 67 days in his first season with his new club, he must be active for an additional 23 days in his second season to satisfy the Rule 5 requirements.

Any player chosen in the Rule 5 draft may be traded to any team while under the Rule 5 restrictions, but the restrictions transfer to the new team. If the new team does not want to keep the player on its 25-man roster for the season, he must be offered back to the team of which he was a member when chosen in the draft.

Selection eligibility

Players are eligible for selection in the Rule 5 draft who are not on their major league organization’s 40-man roster and:

  • were 18 or younger on the June 5 preceding their signing and this is the fifth Rule 5 draft upcoming; or
  • were 19 or older on the June 5 preceding their signing and this is the fourth Rule 5 draft upcoming.

These exemption periods (one year longer than those in effect previously) went into effect as part of a new Collective Bargaining Agreement in October 2006. The change took effect immediately, exempting many players from the 2006 Rule 5 draft even though they had been signed in some cases more than four years before the new agreement came into effect. Prior to the rule change, players were exempt from the first two or three Rule 5 drafts held after their signing (regardless of the year they were drafted), rather than from the first three or four Rule 5 drafts after their signing.

Cost and example

To prevent excessive turnover in the minor league levels, each draftee costs $50,000. If the draftee does not stay on the selecting team’s 25-man (major league) roster all season, the player must be offered back to his original team at half-price ($25,000). Organizations may also draft players from AA or lower to play for their AAA affiliates (for $12,000) and may draft players from A teams or lower to play for their AA affiliates (for $4,000).[3]

The Rule 5 draft has opened opportunities for teams to take other teams’ top prospects who may not be ready for the major leagues. A prominent example is Johan Santana, who was chosen in the 1999 Rule 5 draft by the Florida Marlins when the Houston Astros declined to put him on their 40-man roster, and then traded to the Minnesota Twins in a pre-arranged deal.[4] The Twins kept Santana on their roster for the 2000 season, despite the pitcher’s subpar performance that season (6.49 ERA) which was unsurprising given his youth and inexperience. After the 2000 season, the Twins had the right to option Santana to their minor league system, but chose not to during the 2001 season. He was briefly optioned to Class AAA at the start of the 2002 season, then returned to the major leagues at the end of May and established himself as an above-average pitcher; he went on to win Cy Young Awards in 2004 and 2006. Santana had not played above Class A in minor league baseball before being chosen in the Rule 5 draft,[5] and he likely would not have made his major league debut until at least the 2001 or the 2002 season with the Astros, if at all.[citation needed]

The Yanks lost these players in the Rule 5 draft on Thursday (you can’t protect everyone, and with the Yanks’ strong farm system…..)

RHP Angelo Gomez to the Braves.

LHP Nestor Cortes to the Orioles. Cortes just turned 23 and in A+, AA and AAA went 7-4, 2.06 this year.

1B Mike Ford to Seattle. 25, a lefty hitter. Between AA/AAA hit .270-20-86.

RHP Jose Mesa, the son of the long term reliever Jose Mesa. to the Orioles.

RHP Yancoules Baez to the Twins.

C Sharif Othman, 28, to Miami. Othman was only in High A/AA and hit .223-7-22 in 72 games. A bit old to be in the low minors.

Pardon my spelling on some players.

The Yanks did take OF Junior Soto from Cleveland. A righty hitter, he was in A ball and hit .172-9-17 in 52 games. Just 20.  This was in the minor league portion of the draft and not the portion described above.

 

Unanimous and Near Unanimous ROYs. A “Holliday” for the A’s?

The AL ROY (Rookie of the Year) was unanimous. The “Desperate Housewife,” Evan Longoria, 3B, Tampa Bay. Longoria helped lead his team into the WS by hitting .272-27-85 in 122 games. He had an OPS+ (adjusted OPS, 100=average) of 130, was 7 for 7 in SB, and was excellent defensively.

The NL ROY was almost unanimous. Geovany Soto got all but one vote. The Cubs catcher had 1, 25 and 54 AB from 2005-2007, but played in 141 games in 2008 and had 494 at bats. He hit .285-23-86 for a 120 OPS+ in helping the Cubs make the playoffs.

The only vote that didn’t go to Soto went to Joey Votto of the Reds. .297-24-84 for the Reds 1B. OPS+ 124.

Pete Abraham has some good stuff on his blog.

Here is a list of the free agents, ranked in order.

Also, Baseball America ranks its top 10 Yankee prospects:

Baseball America’s Top 10 Prospects lists are based on projections of a player’s long-term worth after discussions with scouting and player-development personnel. All players who haven’t exceeded the major league rookie standards of 130 at-bats or 50 innings pitched (without regard to service time) are eligible.

This is their list:

1. Austin Jackson OF AA, .285-9-69-19
2. Jesus Montero C/DH Low A .326-17-87
3. Andrew Brackman Starting pitcher, Righty 6’10” In AFL now. Missed year due to TJ surgery.
4. Austin Romine C Low A. .300-10-49
5. Dellin Betances Starting pitcher, Righty 6’8″ Low A. 9-4, 3.67. 135 K in 115 1/3.
6. Zach McAllister Starting pitcher, Righty. Combined Low and High A, 14-9, 2.09. 151 IP.
7. Alfredo Aceves 8-6, 2.62 in minors. 1-0, 2.40 with Yanks in 30 innings. Righty pitcher. Started, but may be long man in 2009.
8. Phil Coke Lefty pitcher. 11-6, 2.79 in minors. 1-0, 0.61 with Yanks in 14 2/3 IP. Lefty relief?
9. Mark Melancon Righty relief pitcher. 8-1, 2.27 combined minor league record.
10. Bradley Suttle 3B .271-11-44 in Low A.

Pete doesn’t see Melancon behind Aceves and Coke, but he could not much quibble with their list otherwise.

I think Top Prospect Alert will be coming out with their list soon, and when they do, I’ll post it for comparison. I put the position after the name for your convenience, also what they did this year and where. Note some people that dropped out include Alan Horne (2-4, 8.77 in a tough, injury-plagued year), Jeff Marquez (combined 8-8, 4.47, mostly AAA), Humberto Sanchez (in AFL now, missed most of 2008 due to injury), Chase Wright (I’m surprised he dropped off the list. He was a combined 10-3, 2.80 at AA/AAA), and 1B Brandon Laird (who didn’t do badly at Low A, .273-23-86, and I’m a bit surprised he dropped off). Having Wright and Laird actually fall out of the top 10 may be a good thing. It shows depth.

Some people got enough PT in the majors to drop off the list. Hughes, Kennedy, Brett Gardner…

Well, it isn’t the Cardinals. In a bit of a shocker, Matt Holliday appears headed to the A’s.
It's just a Holiday
Ooh youre a holiday , such a holiday
Ooh youre a holiday , such a holiday

Pinstripe Prospects: The Minor League Report. Christian Garcia returns.

AAA: SWB PPD. Click on the link for their stats.

AA: Trenton won 4-3. Kevin Russo (.284) had a double & triple & 2 RBI. Austin Jackson (.277) and Colin Curtis (.289) had two hits apiece. P. J. Pilittere was 1-3 with an RBI (.302). George Kontos gave up 2 runs in 5 IP (3.40). Zach Kroenke pitched two scoreless innings (3-0, 2.93). Mike Gardner pitched 2 innings, 5th save, 1 Run, (3.20).

A (Advanced): Tampa lost 3-2. Christian Garcia, 22, entered 2007 as the Yanks’ 6th best prospect according to Baseball America. Injuries cost him all of 2007 and all of 2008 until now. How he comes back, who knows. Garcia (0-1, 1.93) pitched ok in his first appearance of the season. He went 4 2/3, 2 R, 1 ER, 6 H, 1 walk and 6 K. For his first time back from injury, not bad. Edgar Soto gave up a run in 2 1/3 (3.38). Jose Valdez pitched a scoreless inning (2.05). James “Fenimore” Cooper had 2 hits, double, RBI.

A: Charleston lost 5-2. Justin Snyder (.307), Braedyn Pruitt (.370) and David Williams (.230) had 2 hits apiece. Jesus Montero (.302) drove in his 32nd run. Lance Pendleton (2.87) threw five scoreless innings, but Jonathan Ortiz made an error while giving up 4 unearned runs in the top of the 9th.